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A Home Away from Home: Navigating the Challenges of Living Abroad in Paris

Living abroad can be an incredibly enriching experience, allowing you to immerse yourself in a new culture and broaden your horizons. But, it can also be a daunting prospect, with a range of challenges to navigate along the way. For those moving to Paris, the experience can be particularly intense.


In this article, we'll explore the social and emotional challenges of living abroad in Paris, and offer some tips and advice on how to make the most of your experience. Whether you're planning a short-term stay or a longer-term move, there's plenty to consider, from cultural differences and language barriers to homesickness and social isolation.


We'll start by looking at some of the common challenges faced by expats and newcomers in Paris, before delving into some practical tips for making the most of your time in this incredible city. So if you're thinking of moving to Paris, or are already here and looking for some support, read on for our guide to navigating the challenges of living abroad in Paris.


Young adults exploring Paris with flatmates from Wellow coliving community


I. The Emotional Challenges of Living Abroad in Paris


Moving to a new country means leaving behind friends, family, and the familiar comforts of home. It can be difficult to adjust to a new culture, language, and way of life. These challenges can be especially daunting for those moving to a bustling city like Paris.


One of the biggest emotional challenges of living abroad is homesickness. It's normal to miss the people, places, and things that you're used to, but it can be hard to shake the feeling of longing for home.


Homesickness can be exacerbated by feelings of loneliness and isolation, which are common among expats.

Another challenge of living abroad is culture shock. Even if you've visited Paris before, living there full-time is a completely different experience. The French culture may have different customs, social norms, and values than what you're used to. Adjusting to these differences can take time and effort.


Language barriers can also be a source of emotional stress for expats in Paris. While many Parisians speak English, the language barrier can still pose a challenge in day-to-day life. Struggling to communicate can be frustrating and isolating.


Finally, adapting to a new way of life can be a challenge. Paris is a fast-paced city, and it can be overwhelming for newcomers. Adjusting to a new routine, such as navigating public transportation or finding a grocery store, can take time and patience.


In the next section, we'll explore some tips and strategies for overcoming these emotional challenges and thriving as an expat in Paris. But first, let's take a closer look at some of the social challenges that expats in Paris may face.


II. Overcoming the language barrier and culture shock


One of the biggest challenges of living in a foreign country is navigating the language barrier. Paris is known for its French language, which can be daunting for non-native speakers. However, learning French can be an enriching experience that allows you to immerse yourself in the local culture.


There are many language schools and organizations in Paris that offer French language classes for foreigners. The Alliance Française is one of the most well-known and respected language schools in Paris, offering a range of courses for all levels of French proficiency. The French government also offers French classes for free or at a reduced cost to new immigrants through various programs.


Joining local groups or clubs that align with your interests is another great way to practice speaking French in a casual setting and meet locals. Paris is home to many language exchange programs and conversation groups, such as Polyglot Club, which provide opportunities for language practice.


Remember, making mistakes is a natural part of the learning process, so don't be afraid to stumble over your words when speaking French. Parisians appreciate the effort and are often happy to help you improve your language skills. With practice and perseverance, you'll find that speaking French becomes easier and more natural over time.


One of the biggest challenges of living abroad is experiencing culture shock. Paris, with its unique language, customs, and way of life, can be especially overwhelming for newcomers. However, there are steps you can take to overcome culture shock and make the most of your time in Paris. One of the best ways to do this is to immerse yourself in the local culture. Take advantage of the many museums, art galleries, and cultural events that Paris has to offer. And don't forget to try the local cuisine - Paris is renowned for its food!


At Wellow, we understand how important it is to feel connected to the local community. That's why we organise regular events and activities for our residents to get together and explore Paris. From wine tastings to museum visits to volunteer work, there's always something going on at Wellow.


Community event with Wellow coliving members in Paris


III. Overcoming Homesickness and Loneliness in Paris


One of the biggest challenges of living abroad is dealing with homesickness and loneliness. It's natural to miss your friends and family back home, especially during the first few weeks and months of your stay in Paris. However, it's important to remember that you're not alone in feeling this way, and that there are steps you can take to overcome these feelings and make meaningful connections in your new city.


Join local groups and clubs

Paris is a vibrant and diverse city with a wide range of communities and interest groups. Joining local clubs and groups can be a great way to meet like-minded people and make new friends. Whether you're interested in sports, music, art, or cooking, there's a group out there for you. Check out Meetup, Facebook groups, and other online resources to find events and activities that interest you.


Explore the city and its culture

Paris is a city with a rich history and culture, and there's no shortage of things to see and do. Exploring the city's museums, galleries, and landmarks can be a great way to learn about its history and immerse yourself in its culture. Visit famous landmarks such as the Eiffel Tower, the Louvre Museum, and Notre Dame Cathedral. Take a stroll through the Latin Quarter or Montmartre and discover the city's hidden gems. Join a guided tour or take a language class to get more involved in the local culture. To find out about the best spots, exhibitions, restaurants or parties, follow Le Bonbon or Le Bonbon nuit.



Artistic community event with Wellow coliving members in Paris
Connect with fellow students, expats, and newcomers

Paris is home to many international students and expats, and connecting with them can be a great way to build a support network and make new friends. Joining student organizations or attending expat events can be a great way to meet people who are going through similar experiences as you. The American University of Paris, Sciences Po, and Sorbonne University are just a few of the many institutions that host events for international students.


One of the best ways to combat loneliness and isolation while living abroad in Paris is by joining a coliving community like Wellow. Wellow is a vibrant and diverse community of young adults and students who live in shared apartments around Paris. The community is made up of half international residents and half French residents, offering a great opportunity to meet people from different cultures and backgrounds. At Wellow, there are plenty of opportunities to get together with your fellow residents and make new friends. The community regularly organizes after-work drinks, sports activities, and volunteering opportunities with local charities. These events are a great way to break the ice and get to know other people in the community.


Embrace the local lifestyle

Living in Paris means adapting to a new way of life, and it's important to embrace the local lifestyle and customs. Try the local cuisine, learn some French phrases, and enjoy the city's nightlife. Parisians love their coffee, so find a local café and make it your regular spot. Take advantage of the city's bike-sharing program and explore the streets of Paris on two wheels. By embracing the local lifestyle, you'll feel more connected to the city and its people.


By taking these steps, you can overcome homesickness and loneliness and make meaningful connections in your new home. Remember that it takes time to adjust to a new culture and way of life, but with patience and an open mind, you can make the most of your experience in Paris.



Building Community and Facing Challenges in Paris


Living abroad in a new city like Paris can be both exciting and daunting. It's natural to feel overwhelmed by the cultural and linguistic differences, and it's not uncommon to experience homesickness or isolation. However, by joining a coliving community like Wellow, you can find a supportive network of like-minded individuals who are also navigating their way through life in a new place.


At Wellow, we believe that living with others is not just about sharing an apartment, but about building meaningful connections and a sense of belonging. Our community events and activities provide opportunities to meet new people, make friends, and create lasting memories in Paris. We strive to create a warm and welcoming environment where everyone feels valued and included.


We understand that living abroad is not without its challenges, but we believe that with the right mindset and support, it can be an incredibly enriching and rewarding experience. By being open to new experiences, embracing the local culture, and surrounding yourself with a supportive community, you can overcome any obstacles and thrive in your new home away from home.


If you're interested in learning more about our coliving community in Paris, we invite you to visit our website and discover the many benefits of joining Wellow.


After work drinks event for young adults with Wellow coliving members in Paris

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